Post(s) tagged with "Hong Kong"

Two Years after the Bloodbath
Exactly two years ago, on the day after the bloodbath at the Quirino Grandstand, this was the headline of The Philippine Daily Inquirer. Yesterday marked the second year of the infamous Manila Hostage Tragedy where 8 Hong Kong tourists died when dismissed police officer Senior Inspector Rolando Mendoza hijacked a tourist bus carrying 25 people in an attempt to get his job back.
Yesterday’s commemoration may have been overshadowed by other issues and events (Sen. Tito Sotto’s alleged plagiarism and his staff’s moronic defense and the sudden death of DILG Secretary Jesse Robredo, to name some) but this tragic event in our history is still fresh in my mind, as if it happened just recently.
I was then in between doing my editing works and procrastinating on Tumblr when the news broke out the morning of August 23, 2010. Having seen a similar situation years before when Jun Ducat held hostage preschool students in a bus, I told myself that this will also come to a peaceful end. I even exchanged some good laughs and ideas with an online buddy, Tita Marj, about the possibility of creating a biopic for Captain Mendoza and guessing who would be the best actor to portray him (I personally chose Efren Reyes Jr. and Spanky Manikan for the role).
The whole afternoon and early evening went by with me tweeting and posting some stuff on Tumblr about the hostage crisis, my opinion, my rant against Captain Mendoza, on how would it affect our image to the international community, and being glued on the evening news on television, monitoring the events.
And then the unexpected came. The whole country - and perhaps the whole world - was in shock.
Most of us, I think, were glued then on the television and have watched the events that lead to a bloodbath. Those who have no television during that time resorted to social media, blogging site Tumblr included, for updates. My dashboard became a news feed of sort, thanks to the Tumblristas who posted the events (and opinion) on the blogging platform. (There was even a pun created during that time on David Karp’s cyber empire. Tumblr became ‘Tumblr Patrol’ in reference to the blow by blow posting of events just like in the news program ‘TV Patrol’.)
After the tragic event, the eyes of the whole world were glued to our country and the then two-month old Aquino administration was put under the spotlight of local and international ridicule. The Pinoy culture of ‘mas magaling ang miron’, ‘sisihan' and 'turuan' were seen days after the event. Memes about how pulpol our policemen were spread on various social media. Angry Facebook users stormed the Facebook page of President Aquino (that lead to its early demise and reconstruction). And to make things worse, photos of policemen and students who were taking pictures with the ill-fated bus spread on the internet (that added to the anger of the citizens of Hong Kong.) 
It has been repeatedly said that no one wanted this to happen. Our country has repeatedly apologized to the victims. But is an apology enough? No. Is justice served to the victims? Apparently, even after two years, not yet.
Yesterday, the families of eight Hong Kong victims who were killed in the hostage crisis stormed our consulate in Hong Kong as they demand for an apology from our Government. And two years after the tragedy, Hong Kong has not lifted its ‘black’ travel warning that discourages its residents from travelling to the Philippines. (It was originally issued on the day of the hostage taking.)
I understand the grief of the victims’ kin. Two years after the event, only one among those who were recommended to be accountable was punished and sacked from office (the alleged extortionist ex-Deputy Ombudsman Emilio Gonzalez III who is one of the causes of captain Mendoza’s outrage). I personally read the recommendation of the Incident Investigation and Review Committee (IIRC) soon after the document was made public and I was disappointed to learn that some of their recommendations were not followed by the Palace. For instance, they did not follow the recommendation of the IIRC to sanction PNP Chief director General Jesus Versoza, Manila City Vice Mayor Isko Moreno, and DILG Undersecretary Rico Puno (the latter, allegedly, was saved because he was the President’s shooting buddy).
But to be fair, I commend the current administration in their efforts in their drive against corruption. We do not want to make another Captain Mendoza among the civilians and our servicemen. It will be remembered that one of the reasons why Captain Mendoza hijacked the bus was the alleged corruption (and bribery for his pending case) on the Office of the Ombudsman.
Two years have passed and although justice is yet to be fully served on the victims, we can see some changes on the system. There’s already a new Ombudsman in the person of Conchita Carpio-Morales. With the sudden death of Sec. Jesse Robredo, the clamor of the public for a clean and honest governance has increased. With the appointment of the new Chief Justice, Maria Lourdes Sereno, hopefully, there is a drastic change in our judiciary. And with the active participation of the people through social media, I think, we are getting closer to the dream of having a clean system.
But before all of these good things to materialize, let us not forget that there are grieving relatives of the victims, there are accountable persons who are yet to be sanctioned, and there is still an elusive justice that is yet to be served.
And I hope this would never happen again. Never again.
Elsewhere:
Manila Hostage Tragedy Survivors call for an Apology from Philippine Government - Two years after the tragedy, the cry of the victims’ families remains the same.
Who were Accountable for the Manila hostage Crisis?  During the commemoration of the first anniversary of the tragedy, GMA News Online looks back at the personalities held liable for the tragedy and examines if justice has indeed been served to the eight victims of dismissed policeman Rolando Mendoza, who was himself killed in a police assault viewed live worldwide.

Two Years after the Bloodbath

Exactly two years ago, on the day after the bloodbath at the Quirino Grandstand, this was the headline of The Philippine Daily Inquirer. Yesterday marked the second year of the infamous Manila Hostage Tragedy where 8 Hong Kong tourists died when dismissed police officer Senior Inspector Rolando Mendoza hijacked a tourist bus carrying 25 people in an attempt to get his job back.

Yesterday’s commemoration may have been overshadowed by other issues and events (Sen. Tito Sotto’s alleged plagiarism and his staff’s moronic defense and the sudden death of DILG Secretary Jesse Robredo, to name some) but this tragic event in our history is still fresh in my mind, as if it happened just recently.

I was then in between doing my editing works and procrastinating on Tumblr when the news broke out the morning of August 23, 2010. Having seen a similar situation years before when Jun Ducat held hostage preschool students in a bus, I told myself that this will also come to a peaceful end. I even exchanged some good laughs and ideas with an online buddy, Tita Marj, about the possibility of creating a biopic for Captain Mendoza and guessing who would be the best actor to portray him (I personally chose Efren Reyes Jr. and Spanky Manikan for the role).

The whole afternoon and early evening went by with me tweeting and posting some stuff on Tumblr about the hostage crisis, my opinion, my rant against Captain Mendoza, on how would it affect our image to the international community, and being glued on the evening news on television, monitoring the events.

And then the unexpected came. The whole country - and perhaps the whole world - was in shock.

Most of us, I think, were glued then on the television and have watched the events that lead to a bloodbath. Those who have no television during that time resorted to social media, blogging site Tumblr included, for updates. My dashboard became a news feed of sort, thanks to the Tumblristas who posted the events (and opinion) on the blogging platform. (There was even a pun created during that time on David Karp’s cyber empire. Tumblr became ‘Tumblr Patrol’ in reference to the blow by blow posting of events just like in the news program ‘TV Patrol’.)

After the tragic event, the eyes of the whole world were glued to our country and the then two-month old Aquino administration was put under the spotlight of local and international ridicule. The Pinoy culture of ‘mas magaling ang miron’, ‘sisihan' and 'turuan' were seen days after the event. Memes about how pulpol our policemen were spread on various social media. Angry Facebook users stormed the Facebook page of President Aquino (that lead to its early demise and reconstruction). And to make things worse, photos of policemen and students who were taking pictures with the ill-fated bus spread on the internet (that added to the anger of the citizens of Hong Kong.) 

It has been repeatedly said that no one wanted this to happen. Our country has repeatedly apologized to the victims. But is an apology enough? No. Is justice served to the victims? Apparently, even after two years, not yet.

Yesterday, the families of eight Hong Kong victims who were killed in the hostage crisis stormed our consulate in Hong Kong as they demand for an apology from our Government. And two years after the tragedy, Hong Kong has not lifted its ‘black’ travel warning that discourages its residents from travelling to the Philippines. (It was originally issued on the day of the hostage taking.)

I understand the grief of the victims’ kin. Two years after the event, only one among those who were recommended to be accountable was punished and sacked from office (the alleged extortionist ex-Deputy Ombudsman Emilio Gonzalez III who is one of the causes of captain Mendoza’s outrage). I personally read the recommendation of the Incident Investigation and Review Committee (IIRC) soon after the document was made public and I was disappointed to learn that some of their recommendations were not followed by the Palace. For instance, they did not follow the recommendation of the IIRC to sanction PNP Chief director General Jesus Versoza, Manila City Vice Mayor Isko Moreno, and DILG Undersecretary Rico Puno (the latter, allegedly, was saved because he was the President’s shooting buddy).

But to be fair, I commend the current administration in their efforts in their drive against corruption. We do not want to make another Captain Mendoza among the civilians and our servicemen. It will be remembered that one of the reasons why Captain Mendoza hijacked the bus was the alleged corruption (and bribery for his pending case) on the Office of the Ombudsman.

Two years have passed and although justice is yet to be fully served on the victims, we can see some changes on the system. There’s already a new Ombudsman in the person of Conchita Carpio-Morales. With the sudden death of Sec. Jesse Robredo, the clamor of the public for a clean and honest governance has increased. With the appointment of the new Chief Justice, Maria Lourdes Sereno, hopefully, there is a drastic change in our judiciary. And with the active participation of the people through social media, I think, we are getting closer to the dream of having a clean system.

But before all of these good things to materialize, let us not forget that there are grieving relatives of the victims, there are accountable persons who are yet to be sanctioned, and there is still an elusive justice that is yet to be served.

And I hope this would never happen again. Never again.

Elsewhere:

Source: juanrepublic

A Year After

This day marks the first anniversary of the infamous Manila Hostage Tragedy where 8 Hong Kong tourists died when dismissed police officer Senior Inspector Rolando Mendoza hijacked a tourist bus carrying 25 people in an attempt to get his job back.

Where were you during that tragic incident?

I was then in between doing my editing works and procrastinating on Tumblr when the news broke out the morning of August 23, 2010. Having seen a similar situation years before when Jun Ducat held hostage preschool students in a bus, I told myself that this will also come to a peaceful end. I even exchanged some good laughs and ideas with Tita Marj about the possibility of creating a biopic for Captain Mendoza and guessing who would be the best actor to portray him.

The whole afternoon and early evening went by with me tweeting and posting some stuff on Tumblr about the hostage crisis, my opinion, my rant against Captain Mendoza, on how would it affect our image to the international community, and being glued on the evening news on television, monitoring the events.

And then the unexpected came. The whole country - and perhaps the whole world - was in shock.

Most of us, I think, were glued then on the television and have watched the events that lead to a bloodbath. Those who have no television during that time resorted to social media, blogging site Tumblr included, for updates. My dashboard became a news feed of sort, thanks to the Tumblristas who posted the events (and opinion) on this blogging platform. (There was even a pun created during that time here on David Karp’s cyber empire. Tumblr became ‘Tumblr Patrol’ in reference to the blow by blow posting of events just like in the news program ‘TV Patrol’.)

After the tragic event, the eyes of the whole world were glued to our country and the then two-month old Aquino administration was put under the spotlight of local and international ridicule. The Pinoy culture of ‘mas magaling ang miron’, ‘sisihan' and 'turuan' were seen days after the event. Memes about how pulpol our policemen were spread on various social media. Angry Facebook users stormed the Facebook page of President Aquino (that lead to its early demise and reconstruction). And to make things worse, photos of policemen and students who were taking pictures with the ill-fated bus spread on the internet (that added to the anger of the citizens of Hong Kong.) 

It has been repeatedly said that no one wanted this to happen. Our country has repeatedly apologized to the victims. But is an apology enough? No. Is justice served to the victims? (Click the GMAnews.tv link below to read what happened to the personalities that were held liable for the tragedy.)

And aside from justice for the victims, have our authorities learned about this tragedy? And in the event that a similar event happen again, are we assured not to have another bloodbath similar to this one?

Every mistake requires penance and contrition. Every tragedy requires justice for the aggrieved party. Forgiveness may come later but the first move to reconciliation and closure must first come from the aggressor.

Aside from justice for the victims and the preparedness of our forces, I also want our government to clean up the system so as not to make another Captain Mendoza. It may be remembered that one of the reasons why Captain Mendoza hijacked the bus was the alleged corruption (and bribery for his pending case) on the Office of the Ombudsman. Daang Matuwid? I hope so.

On the first year of the Manila Hostage Tragedy, I am inviting you to say a prayer or two (or just be still and be silent for a minute, if you are an agnostic or an atheist)for the victims. And pray to God - or ask the Cosmos - that this may not happen again.

Never again.

Read more here: The 2010 Manila Hostage Crisis: A Year After (GMAnews.tv)’  GMA News Online looks back at the personalities held liable for the tragedy and examines if justice has indeed been served to the eight victims of dismissed policeman Rolando Mendoza, who was himself killed in a police assault viewed live worldwide. 

Source: Photos courtesy of Hufftingtonpost.com

Post Scriptum: During the height and the aftermath of the hostage crisis, I made a handful of blog entries here at the Republic. You may want to visit and read them by clicking these links: 1. Dear Senior Inspector Rolando Mendoza 2. Ang Pinakamatapang na Pulis ng Maynila 3. Ang Linya na Hindi Inirerespeto ng mga Usisero 4. And the ‘Most Hated Person’ Award is Given to.. 5. Ano kaya Bersyon ng Kuwento ng mga “Kontrabida”? 6. Araw ng mga Bayani? (WOTL) 7. Major Major’

Source: The Huffington Post

Ronald Singson’s Incarceration
Your cocaine is the key to the crime.
The verdict is out. Ilocos Sur Representative Ronald Singson, son of Pambansang Anino Chavit Singson, gets 18 months in prison in a Hong Kong prison after he pleaded guilty to cocaine trafficking and avoided a maximum life penalty by convincing the judge the drugs were for his personal use.
We saw this one coming. We are expecting that Ronald, the lead star of the movie Lovi and Other Drugs, will certainly be imprisoned in Hong Kong.
With the verdict out, calls for his expulsion from the House of Representatives and other (violent) reactions are once again flooding my Twitter timeline, my Facebook news feed, from critics down to the ordinary Juan interviewed in the news, and our neighbor’s inuman sessions. 
Some are saying that 18 months imprisonment not enough. They demand more years behind bars for Tito Ronald (Pwede!).
Sana daw, si Ronald na lang ang pambayad utang ng Pilipinas sa Hong Kong for the August 23 Manila Hostage Crisis where 8 Hong Kong nationals died (Ang sama niyo!).
Puwede din daw pang-X deal si Ronald para sa 3 Pinoy na nasa death row sa China, tutal, drugs din naman ang kaso. In short, si Ronald na lang daw dapat ang bitayin. (That’s bad!)
Are you satisfied with the Hong Kong court’s decision to imprison Representative Ronald Singson for 18 months? Or do you want more? Should he resign as Ilocos Sur Representative and not wait for Congressmen to expel him? What are your thoughts?

Ronald Singson’s Incarceration

Your cocaine is the key to the crime.

The verdict is out. Ilocos Sur Representative Ronald Singson, son of Pambansang Anino Chavit Singson, gets 18 months in prison in a Hong Kong prison after he pleaded guilty to cocaine trafficking and avoided a maximum life penalty by convincing the judge the drugs were for his personal use.

We saw this one coming. We are expecting that Ronald, the lead star of the movie Lovi and Other Drugs, will certainly be imprisoned in Hong Kong.

With the verdict out, calls for his expulsion from the House of Representatives and other (violent) reactions are once again flooding my Twitter timeline, my Facebook news feed, from critics down to the ordinary Juan interviewed in the news, and our neighbor’s inuman sessions

  • Some are saying that 18 months imprisonment not enough. They demand more years behind bars for Tito Ronald (Pwede!).
  • Sana daw, si Ronald na lang ang pambayad utang ng Pilipinas sa Hong Kong for the August 23 Manila Hostage Crisis where 8 Hong Kong nationals died (Ang sama niyo!).
  • Puwede din daw pang-X deal si Ronald para sa 3 Pinoy na nasa death row sa China, tutal, drugs din naman ang kaso. In short, si Ronald na lang daw dapat ang bitayin. (That’s bad!)

Are you satisfied with the Hong Kong court’s decision to imprison Representative Ronald Singson for 18 months? Or do you want more? Should he resign as Ilocos Sur Representative and not wait for Congressmen to expel him? What are your thoughts?

Source: juanrepublic

LOVI AND OTHER DRUGS
Ilocos Sur Representative Ronald Singson, son of Pambansang Anino Ilocos Sur Governor Luis “Chavit” Singson, pleads guilty in Hong Kong drug trafficking case.

Philippine Rep. Ronald Singson was not immediately sentenced in Hong Kong’s District Court pending testimony on whether he planned on consuming the cocaine or sharing it with others — a factor that could influence the length of his sentence.He was caught carrying 0.24 ounces (6.67 grams) of cocaine at the southern Chinese city’s international airport in July. Drug trafficking carries a maximum penalty of life imprisonment and a fine of HK$5 million ($640,000).In his own testimony, Singson pleaded for leniency, apologizing to the judge and the people of Hong Kong. The 42-year-old legislator said he used cocaine on and off since 2004.He said he went on a cocaine-and-gambling binge after attending an Usher concert in Manila he helped stage on July 9, frustrated by an argument with his girlfriend (Juan: Allegedly Lovi Poe). He then decided to join a friend attending a poker tournament in Macau and was arrested while transiting through Hong Kong.
(Read the whole news on gmanews.tv)

To Congressman Ronald Singson, if you still have love for this country, do not wait for your comrades at the House of Representative to expel you. Please resign from your position for delicadeza’s sake. With that move, I think you will still earn the respect of some of our countrymen.
If they have still respect for you, Sir.
But if not, and in case you rot there in Hong Kong, you may watch the movie Love and Other Drugs on your prison cell. I assure you, that is a very good movie.
And better than cocaine.
Note: Original photo courtesy of circuitmag.net. Poster inspired by the movie “Love & Other Drugs” and The Professional Heckler’s tweet earlier this evening.

LOVI AND OTHER DRUGS

Ilocos Sur Representative Ronald Singson, son of Pambansang Anino Ilocos Sur Governor Luis “Chavit” Singson, pleads guilty in Hong Kong drug trafficking case.

Philippine Rep. Ronald Singson was not immediately sentenced in Hong Kong’s District Court pending testimony on whether he planned on consuming the cocaine or sharing it with others — a factor that could influence the length of his sentence.

He was caught carrying 0.24 ounces (6.67 grams) of cocaine at the southern Chinese city’s international airport in July. Drug trafficking carries a maximum penalty of life imprisonment and a fine of HK$5 million ($640,000).

In his own testimony, Singson pleaded for leniency, apologizing to the judge and the people of Hong Kong. The 42-year-old legislator said he used cocaine on and off since 2004.

He said he went on a cocaine-and-gambling binge after attending an Usher concert in Manila he helped stage on July 9, frustrated by an argument with his girlfriend (Juan: Allegedly Lovi Poe). He then decided to join a friend attending a poker tournament in Macau and was arrested while transiting through Hong Kong.

(Read the whole news on gmanews.tv)

To Congressman Ronald Singson, if you still have love for this country, do not wait for your comrades at the House of Representative to expel you. Please resign from your position for delicadeza’s sake. With that move, I think you will still earn the respect of some of our countrymen.

If they have still respect for you, Sir.

But if not, and in case you rot there in Hong Kong, you may watch the movie Love and Other Drugs on your prison cell. I assure you, that is a very good movie.

And better than cocaine.

Note: Original photo courtesy of circuitmag.net. Poster inspired by the movie “Love & Other Drugs” and The Professional Heckler’s tweet earlier this evening.

Source: juanrepublic


This is a personal blog where rants, raves, and everything in between is written and posted.

About the Blogger: His name is Juan, a frustrated writer who hails from a sauna town at the foot of Mount Makiling. He spends his being an overworked and underpaid High School teacher and being a self-proclaimed superhero who is dreaming and trying to make a difference, one post at a time.

For correspondence, please email me at juanrepublica@gmail.com

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